Lackawanna River Heritage Trail Guidebook

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The new Guidebook to the Lackawanna River Heritage Trail and the D&H Rail-Trail is hot off the presses!  This handy, spiral-bound pocket compendium not only provides detailed information about navigating the entire seventy mile Lackawanna River Heritage Trail corridor from New York State to Pittston (and the reverse!) and GPS coordinates, but it also offers interesting and useful information and photos about the history, culture and significant sites of the Lackawanna Heritage Valley National and State Heritage Area.    The Lackawanna Heritage Valley Authority (LHV) manages the four southern trail sections of the Lackawanna River Heritage Trail.  The Rail-Trail Council of NEPA, Inc., whose office is located in Uniondale, manages the D&H Rail-Trail, the northern and more rural parts of the trail.
A regional map featured in the guidebook helps orient trail users to the entire 70-mile route.  The trail is shown in red. The five trail sections are color-coded on the regional map, and each is highlighted separately in dedicated chapters of the guide. Each chapter includes detailed maps, a written description of the route and conditions, trailheads and important amenities, points of interest, and a historical narrative. The scale for each map is indicated on the right margin. A key to map symbols used in the guide is located on the inside back cover.

Trail Guidebooks are for sale at $19.95 at LHV offices in Scranton or ordered on line at our online storeIt is a convenient reference guide to the Lackawanna Heritage Valley for trail users and history lovers alike!
The Trail Guidebook also can be downloaded for free at:
LRHT Guidebook (PDF)

The trail is a work in progress. As of today, approximately 50 miles are open to the public, with the remaining 20 miles under development. Where portions of the trail are still in development, the Guidebook illustrates on-street routes that bridge the gaps between completed segments. Along the trail, surfaces vary from pavement to stonedust to the unimproved soils and cinders of old rail beds. The detailed maps show the status of each section, as well as the type of surfaces to expect.

Information on grade, surfaces, and ADA accessibility can be found on trailhead signs and in a box of each section of the guidebook